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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 31
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and new jersey: another storm takes aim at the region, as sandy's recovery slogs on, and the hunt for fuel heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one day away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow rose 19 points, the nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for those coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow's big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see n
. >> this week on "inside washington," sandy's brutal october surprised. >> i want to thank the president personally. >> how many votes are these photographs worth? how do you compete with the natural disaster? climate change? neither candidate wants to go near its. the new unemployment number -- how will it play in the polling place? jeep jobs in china flap. >> sold chrysler to italians who are going to build jeeps in china. >> an outrageous lie. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we thought this is going to be a special preelection broadcast, that all we would have to do is handicapped the election. then along came hurricane sandy. in politics, a wise man told me once that you can never see around the corner. i don't want to minimize the tragic human dimensions of this giant storm and its aftermath, but this is a political program and the election is next tuesday, so here goes. we start with new jersey gov. christie prior to hurricane sandy. >> send you back to chicago -- give you the plane trip back to chicago you have earned. i cannot thank the presid
will. >> and if you live here, the election is secondary. a week after sandy blew through in new york neighborhood, it's still waiting for help. welcome to our viewers on public television in america. and also around the globe. for those of you despairing that this presidential election has gone on far too long, good news. it's almost over. the final day of campaigning saw the candidates flying across the country in a last bid for votes. tonight we have comprehensive coverage of how the campaign looks at the very end. the bbc north american editor has been with the obama campaign in wisconsin. he starts our coverage. >> win or lose, it's the last time he'll campaign to save his job. he's chriscrossed a disenchanted nation, traveling 8,000 miles in three days. cajoling voters for giving him another chance. bruce springsteen add as final push. he adds more than star power with songs of the shattered american dreams, of the working american class. ♪ i believed in a promised land ♪ >> he defended the president and explained why that land has prove so hard to reach. >> i'm here today b
-election, just take another look at the widespread havoc caused by the frankenstorm benignly named sandy. having surveyed all this damage "bloomberg business week" concluded: "it's global warming, stupid: if hurricane sandy doesn't persuade americans to get serious about climate change, nothing will." well it was enough to prompt president obama, at his press conference this week, to say more about global warming than he did all year. >> i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacted by human behavior and carbon emissions. and as a consequence, i think we've got an obligation to future generations to do something about it. >> but he made it clear that actually doing something about it will take a back seat to the economy for now. he did return to new york on thursday to review the recovery effort on staten island. climate change and hurricane sandy brought naomi klein to town, too. you may know her as the author of "the shock doctrine: the rise of disaster capitalism." readers of two influential magazines to put naomi klein high on the list of the 100 leading public thinke
wall street today. instead, stocks sank on worries that the costs of hurricane sandy will eat into profits. the dow jones industrial average lost 139 points to close at 13,093. the nasdaq fell almost 38 points to close at 2,982. for the week, the dow and the nasdaq were off a fraction of 1%. korean auto makers hyundai and kia could end up paying hundreds of millions of dollars to car owners as compensation for overstating fuel economy. the environmental protection agency now says an audit revealed that 13 models averaged up to six miles a gallon less than advertised. some 900,000 vehicles sold in the last three years are affected. u.s. intelligence officials have rejected claims they failed to answer the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. there've been reports the cia told its security officers to "stand down" and not try to repel the attackers. senior intelligence officials denied that on thursday. they said a security team responded within 25 minutes, even though they were outmanned and outgunned. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >>
of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other waterside cities. the massive force of the storm's destruction along the jersey shore came fully into view today. town after town presented stark scenes of wrecked homes and boats, underscoring the long process of rebuilding that lies ahead. one of those towns was the long beach community north of atlantic city, where army national guard troops arrived to assist. >> a lot of devastation. the island has been hit very hard. from what i understand there is roughly 18,000 homes without power, there is severe gas leaks, so right now we are just trying to get everything together for the office of emergency management here and the different municipalities and just assist them with whatever needs they have going on. >> brown: and even three days later, some long beach residents still could not believe the power of the storm. >> this was the deepest water i have ever seen, in my lifetime of being here. i was 11 in the '62 storm and the water
. >> ifill: the northeast took slow steps toward recovery today, one week after hurricane sandy hit. but for many in new jersey and new york, normal routines are still a long way off. we have two reports, beginning with an overview from kwame holman. >> reporter: it was the closest think to a full-scale morning commute since the storm hit a week ago. it taxed transit systems to the limit in new york city, connecticut and parts of new jersey >> we keep missing trains because it's so packed you can't enter the trains >> reporter: lines stretched for blocks as thousands of people tried to get to work. trains from new jersey to new york remained out, but key subway lines connecting manhattan to brooklyn under the east river were open. and the statten island ferry was running. >> i don't think it's really normal for anyone right now. we have so much on our minds right now especially for those who have family that lost everything, you know. not normal yet. >> reporter: the trarns it challenges came on top of a cold night for thousands of people still without power with temperatures droppi
week after breaking sandy, a polling stations are being set up in many areas. >> election 2012 started cold for karen and john. . and in their basement, flooded by hurricane sandy, is damp and musty. are you thinking about the election? >> is an important in puritan voting is that -- is a part of the american process. -- is an important thing. voting is a part of the american process. >> at a tent, a cardboard sign attached to some voting booths. but i would have voted on a piece of paper and mail it if i had to. >> it is one week since the big storm throughout the power and crippled vast areas. today, there were dumping of the sewage pipes as the army moved into help. >> considering the devastation here it is a wonder that an election can take place at all. but voters and authorities have been determined to make sure it can go ahead. >> in most areas it was business as usual. pacquiao on its feet pretty much in manhattan. -- back on its feet pretty much in manhattan. in new jersey, they can vote at any location. in the coastal suburbs, this has been an election like no other. >> let's
searching moment is they still thing that romney was on the rise until hurricane sandy hit. >> is there anything in exit polls that suggests that -- that that froze the race? >> not that it froze the race but 42% of the electorate said that hurricane sandy was a factor or a small factor in their decision and obama carried them handily. i think it goes back if you're talking about the economic question. this economy was not so bad that it guaranteed that the president was going to lose. political scientist that i spoke to said you guys are writing about the unemployment rate being at a historically high level for someone to try to get re-elected or that the growth rates are lukewarm, anemic but in reality it was enough not to guarantee election but to get him over the top. and if you look at the exit polls again, he did not lose the economic argument. he didn't win it decisively but governor romney didn't win it decisively. gwen: we promised you that there would be truth and consequence. first up, for the president and the house speaker as the government faces mandatory year
digits ahead here. we know that. and with the impact of sandy, we don't really know how it's going to affect the popular vote on the east coast. >> belva: that is the storm. >> the storm, the hurricane. new jersey, you're talking about, new york, i'm hearing ohio there's some effects. this could be an issue. we really -- this is a -- could be a cliff hanger. >> belva: we seem to be able to talk about most things, very little about issues in this whole election cycle, because there's been such a predominant tax and other groups contributing to races. again, we feel the ping of money when it comes to the congressional race. >> absolutely. and sacramento in particular has been an incredible hot bed of spending on congressional races because there are actually four pretty well contested races that sort of fall within that media market. there's the seventh district, where republican incumbent dan lundgren is in serious trouble as democratic challenger takes a second bite at the apple and that's considered a tossup race. jerry mcnearny is the only democratic incumbent who is considered t
the northeast today with wind, water and snow. its arrival came just over a week after hurricane sandy battered the region. police cars in new york city patrolled low-lying neighborhoods, urging people to evacuate again. the approaching nor'easter brought a wintry mix of cold and snow and possibly, minor flooding in already damaged coastal areas. new york mayor michael bloomberg: >> we haven't and won't order the kind of large scale evacuation we ordered in advance of hurricane sandy but if you are experiencing significant flooding during sandy you should consider taking shelter with friends and family at a safer spot or using one of the city's storm center shelters. >> sreenivasan: in new jersey, thousands of storm-weary people braced for their brush with the new storm, even as cleanup efforts continued from "sandy". governor chris christie suggested it was a little like the biblical plagues. >> when i finally got that final kind of, forecast that i got last night, i said i'm waiting for the locusts and pestilence next, you know. >> sreenivasan: the storm could also bring wind gusts of 65 mile
york, a man in the middle of the response to hurricane sandy. >> the scope of the damage, it looked to me t reminded me of vietnam-- veeted nam, seeing areas that were bombed out, you know, the b-52 bombings. obviously didn't have the structures there that we have here but just wide swathe of damage. >> it always happens in somebody else's backyard n the midwest or south. but something like this would just not anticipated and could not have been anticipated based on our history. >> rose: also this evening the last political weekend before the election on tuesday, we talk with john dickerson the political director of cbs news. >> ohio is still the granddaddy of them all. governor romney's going there the most of all the battleground state, the same with the president. right now you would have to say that the president has the better electoral map, the polls in more battleground states are favouring him. but romney is doing better in north carolina and florida, and on the early vote he's doing well in those states, doing well in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nev
to have a better close than romney. one was the storm. sandy. there's no question that happened. there's no question that the hug if you will, with governor christie played to what people wanted to see. i'm looking at the iowa poll that was done over the weekend. they asked the question "who's the stronger leader?" in iowa romney had a slight advantage, now it's obama 50% to 42%. i agree with what john said earlier. iowa and nevada have been put away. i don't think new hampshire and wisconsin have. but i think that's reflect in that poll. the second that's occurred is every single poll i've seen shows more optimism about the economy than there was a month ago. not people aren't off the charts mind you, but a third of the people think the economy is in good shape. another 20% think it's getting in better shape and those are better numbers than the summer. >> rose: let me ask about florida, john harris, and pennsylvania. >> it looks like florida is most likely in romney's camp. not certain. it seems to me that if obama wins florida he's going to win a bunch of other states and we'll have
storm sandy. >> as we're going through the reconstruction and rebuilding, we have to find ways to build this city back stronger and better than ever before. >> new york city, no electricity, no lights, millions in the dark, fires, subways flooded, ruined rampant, many deaths. >> people work in the subway system, in the construction industry in this state have said they've never seen damage like this, so it's a new reality for us, and i think it's one that we're going to have to deal with. >> besides new york, new jersey was a victim of the disaster. governor chris christie reviewed the situation at the shoreline, president obama at his side. >> we are here for you, and we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help you need until you've rebuilt. >> later, at a news conference, the governor gave his report. >> the president of the united states and i have had six conversations since sunday. that shows a level of caring and concern and interest that i think a leader should be giving to this type of situation. so today, in fact, reed asked me this after i got
of the week which is the super storm sandy. and i wonder in the end -- i know in the beginning i thought to myself, well, in -- only blue states were affected. but i wonder what we saw with christie and bloomberg, whether that at the end didn't reap down to the incumbent? >> probably in a small way. small things can have potentially big consequences. >> you think of the opposite of that if they had anything wrong go wrong and the president was seen as not performing as well as he seems to be that would have been a problem. >> and it really threw the romney campaign too. they couldn't quite figure out what do you do in a time of crisis? >> you have to use your background a lot. >> neither was the incumbent. >> it does give a little tail wind to the closing bipartisan argument that barack obama's trying to make just as mitt romney's trying to make it. and meanwhile while barack obama had to cuts back on some of his campaign travel for three days, his surrogate was bill clinton who is about as good as a surrogate to get out there and get the base -- >> they did not stop trying to win votes
aired this video last week and we are airing it again. in the wake of hurricane sandy, republican governor chris christie, whose state of new jersey was ravaged by the storm took this question from fox. >> reporter: is there any possibility governor romney may go to new jersey to tour some of the damage with you? >> i have no idea, nor am i the least bit concerned or interested. >> now look at this photo of whom governor christie did tour the damage with. president obama. now here's christie on obama's win over romney. time and effort traordinarily into the mitt romney campaign. >> did governor romney, mort, commit a huge mistake by not going to the storm ravaged new jersey coast, joining governor christie and president obama, who were both on the scene? was it a telling mistake? because it was all over the news, night after night as after night for the week preceding the election. >> that's right. it was a mistake in retrospect. but the real mistake romney made was the way he handled chris christie when he was picking a vice presidential partner and christie was extremely alienat
some issues that are dragging it and, third, there was hurricane sandy. what which of these theories do you think are accurate? >> well, wherever anyone loses there are people who say it's the candidates' fault, it's never the strategists fault, it's never the people's fault, it's always the candidates' fault. mitt romney had a difficult primary process. he came through it. therefore he was a better candidate than the other six or eight people that ran in that race. but he did struggle. i do think there are a number of points after the primaries where you didn't quite understand exactly what that came -- campaign was about. so they didn't really get their legs. not only -- not only did they seem to get their legs-- in hindsight it didn't have as much of an impact as much as the media made-- was that debate. i think there are things about that party, especially since 2010, that have really stressed them as far as their ability to be -- go beyond a very small base. as we've had demographic changes cultural changes they've not been able to adapt, so far, or the that changing picture i thin
that was hard hit by hurricane sandy and there were all sorts of questions, gwen, about whether enough people-- people who wanted to vote would be able to vote. we saw the terrible devastation there along the shoreline. but the results are in, at least as much as it takes for the associated press to make a call. >> ifill: i have read more amazing stories today about pregnant women who were on the way to the hospital who decided to vote. people who stood in the dark in lines in order to vote. in spite of what happened with that hurricane. >> woodruff: comparisons being made to hurricane katrina, not only new jersey and new york. we also want to say this brings the electoral college projected total at this point-- it's early in the evening-- to 79 electoral votes for president obama 82 electoral vote for governor romney. we know we need 270-- they need 270 in order to become president. >> ifill: of course we have to talk about new jersey because david and mark, chris christie, the governor of the new jersey, royaled the waters a little bit this week by actually having kind things to say about p
like the hurricane sandy. but one thing that is important to point out is is we're going to see them in waves tonight. some of the things that they tell us early, we've got an early look that basically suggests that the economy, of course, is what drove people to the polls. it doesn't actually tell you who won. you can infer some of the things, the characteristics that are driving people to show up. >> brown: tell us a little bit more because we've got some of the early results. that first one backs up what we just heard from mark, right? it's still the economy. >> exactly. another thing that backs up what david and mark were just talking about is who is in more touch with people like you. 52% said that was president obama. chose obama. they were showing up at the polls. 44% chose governor romney in that sense. that could go to the advertising campaign that the president's team had really tried to say that mitt romney is not like you. i am more in touch with the middle tax. that goes to the tax increase issue which also showed up in the exit polls that six in 10 voters said taxes sho
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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